April 19, 2017

 

Measuring Social Behavior workshop
 

The workshop will gather multiple researchers from all Israeli academic institutes that are dealing with measuring social behavior in order to openly exchange data and methodology. 

 

For more details and registration see:  https://goo.gl/forms/HrXzc7JwMYeypOGG3

  

 

 

August 6, 2015

 

The new paper published in elife gets more attention

 

The new paper by Alex Tendler and Shlomo Wagner: Distinct types of theta rhythmicity are induced by social and fearful stimuli in a network associated with socail memory, published recently in eLife (PubMed), was published as a breakthrough in the newspaper "Jerusalem Post".

 

For more details see:  http://www.jpost.com/Breaking-News/University-of-Haifa-study-shows-how-emotions-affect-learning-and-memory-in-the-brain-411326

 

May 27, 2015

 

The new paper published in elife is now in the news!

 

The new paper by Alex Tendler and Shlomo Wagner: Distinct types of theta rhythmicity are induced by social and fearful stimuli in a network associated with socail memory, published recently in eLife (PubMed), was published as a breakthrough in the Israely newspaper "Haaretz".

For more details see:  http://www.haaretz.co.il/news/science/.premium-1.2645578


 

May 25, 2015

New postDoc joined the lab

 

We are very glad to have Michal Sheleg with us as a new postDoc! Good luck Michal :)

 

 

March 25, 2015

Winning the Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP) grant

We are very glad to annonce that the Laboratory for Neurobiology of Social Behavior has been awarded the highly prestigious and competitive Program Grant Awards 2015 by the Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP). We will share this award with our collaborators Valery Grinevich, University of Heidelberg, Germany; Joseph  Buxbaum, The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, USA; and David Hansel,  University Paris Descartes, France.

This joint multidisciplinary project entitled “Deciphering brain oxytocin circuits controlling social behavior” is aiming to identify, analyze and mathematically model functional oxytocin modules activated in the rat brain by various forms of social behavior.

HFSP Program Grants are awarded for novel collaborations among highly interdisciplinary teams of scientists working in different countries and provide three years support with up to 450,000 USD per year. This year, 21 Program Grants were awarded from a total of over 1000 letters of intent, 61 of which were selected for full application.

For more information please see the project's website: http://oxytocin-social-behavior.com/

In press: http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4660736,00.html

 

February 16, 2015

Publishing a new paper in eLife

We are pleased to announce the publication of a new paper from our lab in the prestigious paper eLife (eLife 03614, 2015).

The paper, entitled Different types of theta rhythmicity are induced by social and fearful stimuli in a network associated with social memory by Alex Tendler and Shlomo Wagner, deals with rhythmic neuronal activity in the rat brain during distinct emotional situations Rhythmic activity in the theta range is thought to promote neuronal communication between brain regions. In this study, we performed chronic telemetric recordings in socially behaving rats to monitor electrophysiological activity in limbic brain regions linked to social behavior. Social encounters were associated with increased rhythmicity in the high theta range (7–10 Hz) that was proportional to the stimulus degree of novelty. This modulation of theta rhythmicity, which was specific for social stimuli, appeared to reflect a brain-state of social arousal. In contrast, the same network responded to a fearful stimulus by enhancement of rhythmicity in the low theta range (3–7 Hz). Moreover, theta rhythmicity showed different pattern of coherence between the distinct brain regions in response to social and fearful stimuli. We suggest that the two types of stimuli induce distinct arousal states that elicit different patterns of theta rhythmicity, which cause the same brain areas to communicate in different modes.

The paper can be read in http://elifesciences.org/content/4/e03614

A podcast interviewing Alex Tendler on the paper can be heard in http://elifesciences.org/podcast/episode19