News

Welcome aboard to our new student Eran Altschuler

25 October 2018

We welcome our new M.Sc. student Eran Altschuler!

Congratulations and warm wishes to our students Inbal and Yosef

27 January 2018

To Inbal for the birth of her daughter, and to Yosef for the birth of his son. We wish them and their families joy and happiness

« »

New publications

Contrasting aspects of tailswinds and asymmetrical response to crosswinds in soaring migrants

21 February 2018

Becciu, P., Panuccio, M., Catoni, C., Dell'Omo, G., and Sapir, N. 2018. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 72(28). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2447-0  

Hovering hummingbird wing aerodynamics during the annual cycle. II. Implications of wing feather moult

21 February 2018

Achache Y, Sapir N, Elimelech Y. 2018. Hovering hummingbird wing aerodynamics during the annual cycle. II. Implications of wing feather moult. Royal Society Open Science 5: 171766. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsos.171766  

Moving in the Anthropocene: Global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

24 January 2018

Science 359 (6374): 466-469 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/359/6374/466  

« »

Insights from chironomid oviposition is useful to visual pest control

Lerner, A, Haspel, C., Sapir, N., Meltser, N., Broza, M. and Shashar, N. 2012. Insights from chironomid oviposition is useful to visual pest control. Fauna Norvegica 31:65-70.

 

ABSTRACT

Efficient visual pest control is still in its infant stages. Although being non-invasive, environmentally friendly and potentially cost effective, we still have not cracked the way to efficiently use it against epidemic vector-carrying and crop-infesting insects. Chironomid ovipostion can provide insights to key factors in visual pest control by investigating the behavior under confined and unconfined conditions. Under confined condition, due to limited amount of oviposition sites and increase of egg density in highly preferred locations, females oviposit in less suitable sites. Intensity and polarization of light reflected from the oviposition sites were found to be important as guiding cues for the females. However,
in the open outdoor where oviposition sites are unlimited, oviposition followed the polarization signal only, and the intensity was ignored as a cue. By applying this approach to reduce chironomid population in a natural reservoir we show that it may be used to divert ovipositing females to egg traps reflecting highly and horizontally polarized light. The potential of using color, intensity and polarization as a basis for building oviposition traps and applying it to pest control in the future, is discussed.

About us

We are a group of scientists devoted to the study of animal flight, including animal movement ecology, behavior, physiology and biomechanics. We study wild animals in the field and in the lab using a diversity of research approaches. We welcome applications for M.Sc. and Ph.D. studies and post-doctoral work in our group at the Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology at the University of Haifa.